October 2001 Archives

October 23, 2001

Logging tapes after slacking

Still too distracted in the aftermath? Project in turnaround? The terrorist subplot deemed inappropriate for our new entertainment environment? No, no, and no. Just the rest of life--including work-related stuff, shuttling between NYC and DC, planning to build one house and to find another in the mean time, on and on--constantly impinging on my time and mind.

Also, recent travel has kept me somewhat out of touch with people who regularly ask, "how's the movie coming? I haven't seen an update on the web." Cue the friends in NYC last week, including one blog coach and sounding board who cracked the whip and told me what I needed to hear: block out the time for working on the movie, to the exclusion of other things.

Somewhat unexpectedly, this weblog is functioning as a catalyst to keep this project moving forward. Not even cart/horse, really; practically harness/cart/horse. [as it turns out, he had his own motivations, too; his thought-provoking entry that mentions this site was in danger of getting stale if I didn't update more frequently. Win-win, Chad. Thanks!]

Screening and logging: another reason it's been easy not to work on the movie is that right now (since the first location in July/August, actually) I'm screening the footage we shot, logging the contents, taking notes, taking stock. This process--time-consuming under standard practice shooting-- is even more consuming because of 1) DV profligacy and low cost ("just shoot 'em all and let the director sort 'em out."), and 2) the Maysles-inspired fly-on-the-wall, unscripted approach.

During the two hours I blocked out yesterday, I screened "Utah 7: LW Follow," a tape shot at my grandmother's house.

Activity: chatting around the table; searching for recipes; starting to make biscuits shucking corn; continuing to make biscuits; negotiating with my young CT cousins for the day's schedule; reading the paper; getting food for one, then another, cousin. It's extremely mundane activity, but my grandmother--who was a schoolteacher for many years--has an unconscious habit of gently narrating almost everything and punctuating her narration with aphorisms, observations, recommendations. "Sometimes it's better to listen silently across the room than to be the one asking all the questions." (a paraphrase).

[note: it's 10:30 AM as I write this, and someone is smoking a fatty right outside my slightly open window. Uptown. Off Park Avenue. They're hanging around, too, not just walking by. It's like it's 1994 or something.]

Image: It's generally pretty static, cleanly framed shots. Enclosed setting is a factor. Not a lot of movement by the subject, really. Also, the almost-impulsive decision to buy-not-borrow a tripod made it a favorite of the crew.

The crew being just me and Jeff, who did most of the shooting, also factored in. Ideally, it'd be more flexible with one more person to focus on sound, mikes, lighting, etc. I remember trying to corral my almost-16 year old cousin into being the boom mike guy, but he successfully evaded us for most of the time.

Technical: The sound sucks regularly. Our new XLR adaptor had a short in it, and there are long stretches where the popping and scratching are so bad, I almost had to mute the monitor. It would've been nice to test everything before getting out of reach of B&H. [note: the replacement's fine, though.]

Light is great. A southfacing kitchen window is all we used. Nice contrast. Some unhappy moments with the wideangle lens. And the graduated filter (for reining in the contrast between sunlight and interior, for example) had a smudge on it. Only for a few minutes, though.

Equipment: This so clearly falls into the, "but it's for the movie project" school of rationalization I shouldn't mention it. Actually, if I'd posted about it two weeks ago, it'd give a too-clear portrayal of how I was avoiding screening tapes. I bought a bag for the tripod at Jack Spade, a store near my old office. Cool store, nice folks. The pitch for the bag was, "it's for carrying blueprints. Or maybe a yoga mat." They can safely add "or a video tripod" to their rap. Here's a review.

Here's a puff piece about the premiere of Jack Spade Films' "Paperboys," directed by Mike Mills. Mike makes Moby videos, too.

There's an authenticity of the actual people and the store and the movie that I greatly admire, which is rendered cringingly fatuous in store reviews and movie premiers co-starring Tina Brown. How susceptible am I, is this project, to being "jaded Manhattanites [getting] a little nostalgic for suburbia?" I'd better make my grandmother executive producer. Back to work.

Actually, I'm leaving for a crazy two-day trip to see some friends whose work is in a show in London.

October 23, 2001

Sitting at JFK in the

Sitting at JFK in the UA/BA lounge, waiting for my flight to London. My pal Andrew left on his full BA flight already, while my schedule is more leisurely (and my United flight barely half full). After birthing this morning's entry, I read this article in the NY Times by John Tierney, which parallels my post of 28 Sept (see archives) and which plays right into discussions Chad and I have had in the wake. Favorite line from the article: "They want to see history with their own eyes, just like Oprah Winfrey and the other V.I.T.'s."

National was practically empty; faint scent Cinnabon and National Guardsmen with AK-47's. No free NYTimes (b/c they weren't delivered to the airport today, apparently). Absolutely no delays taking off or landing, even into LaGuardia. Our flight's approach was across Brooklyn, not up the Hudson, which offered a wide (but not straight down) view of downtown Manhattan. Everybody on the plane was staring or craning to see. [ shots of Manhattan from a private plane]

October 4, 2001

My video equipment's out on

My video equipment's out on loan for a music video, and I've been location scouting in DC for the last few days and haven't been able to work on the movie at all. For cheap thrills, I'm flying out of National Airport this afternoon (good old Delta Shuttle), and will report any happenings of note.

Since 2001 here at greg.org, I've been blogging about the creative process—my own and those of people who interest me. That mostly involves filmmaking, art, writing, research, and the making thereof.

Many thanks to the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for supporting greg.org that time.

comments? questions? tips? pitches? email
greg [at] greg [dot ] org

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about this archive

Posts from October 2001, in reverse chronological order

Older: September 2001

Newer November 2001

recent projects, &c.


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Social Medium:
artists writing, 2000-2015
Paper Monument, Oct. 2016
ed. by Jennifer Liese
buy, $28

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Madoff Provenance Project in
'Tell Me What I Mean' at
To__Bridges__, The Bronx
11 Sept - Oct 23 2016
show | beginnings

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Chop Shop
at SPRING/BREAK Art Show
curated by Magda Sawon
1-7 March 2016

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eBay Test Listings
Armory – ABMB 2015
about | proposte monocrome, rose

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It Narratives, incl.
Shanzhai Gursky & Destroyed Richter
Franklin Street Works, Stamford
Sept 5 - Nov 9, 2014
about | link

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TheRealHennessy Tweets Paintings, 2014 -
about

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Standard Operating Procedure
about | buy now, 284pp, $15.99

CZRPYR2: The Illustrated Appendix
Canal Zone Richard Prince
YES RASTA 2:The Appeals Court
Decision, plus the Court's
Complete Illustrated Appendix (2013)
about | buy now, 142pp, $12.99

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"Exhibition Space" @ apexart, NYC
Mar 20 - May 8, 2013
about, brochure | installation shots


HELP/LESS Curated by Chris Habib
Printed Matter, NYC
Summer 2012
panel &c.


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Destroyed Richter Paintings, 2012-
background | making of
"Richteriana," Postmasters Gallery, NYC

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Canal Zone Richard
Prince YES RASTA:
Selected Court Documents
from Cariou v. Prince (2011)
about | buy now, 376pp, $17.99

archives