November 2013 Archives

November 14, 2013

On Untitled (Beauty Love)

There is beauty in this painting. But the beauty is not what makes you love it.
It's the emotion of what it says, in very simple means about life. And where we all go.

I don't know why I get chills from Tobias Meyer's little promo video for Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster), but here we are.

I matched the audio to Michelle V. Agin's photo from the Times this morning.

And then after reading Ian Bogost's McRib essay again, I realized it was the most persuasive explanation I've seen of Auction Week. So

untitled (where we all go)

November 11, 2013

Balling Art In Harlem USA

Oh hi, no, NBD, just a video of David Hammons making a basketball drawing in a skylit stairwell. Shot probably in 2000-01 by EV photographer Alex Harsley.

If you're one of the three other people in the world who's seen it on YouTube, let me know. 3 VIEWS, PEOPLE.

And here's the gang hanging out on the stoop at 4th Street Photo Gallery in, what, 1994? just talking art. There's the timestamp, Sep.24.1994. Hammons, Herb Gentry, a couple of folks I don't recognize. From just before Phat Free/Kick The Bucket. "11 views"!

[Sept 2014 Update:Thanks to Mary Anne Rose for correcting me. That's not Herb Gentry in the fedora after all. Listening to the video again, it turns out he's named Junior. Also, Rose identified the painter Gerald Jackson in the light blue cap.]

Herb Gentry: "Listen, if you're an older guy, you should be ahead of that by now.
Hammons: "Not necessarily.
HG: Well, where're you gonna be?
DH: You can be anywhere. You can be wherever you want to be. This is one of the last places that anything still should go. And it still goes, but nobody's going with the anything. Everyone has slipped into some category-some formula. And they're waiting for their formula to show up on the chart. And it ain't gonna show up."

Balling Art in Harlem U.S.A. [photodirect's youtube channel]
Bucket Party [same deal]

Hang with me, there's a lot here, and I don't really have the bandwidth to go into it right now, so I'm just going to slap it up here for now:

Walker Art Center curator Bart Ryan recently talked with Liam Gillick and Hito Steyerl about writing as part of their/art practice.

It's part of 9 Artists, Ryan's show about, well, I'm sure the title says plenty. Until I read the 28,000-word catalogue essay, I'm just going with the title. Steyerl's 2007 work Red Alert is in the show, though. It's three redscreen monochrome monitors mounted in landscape, a gesture she describes as "the logical end of the documentary genre,"

rodchenko_pure_red_yellow_blue.jpg
Pure Red Color (Chistyi krasnyi tsvet), Pure Yellow Color (Chistyi
zheltyi tsvet), Pure Blue Color (Chistyi sinii tsvet)
, 1921, each panel 24.5 x 21 or so

in a similar way to Rodchenko declaring his 1921 three-panel monochrome, Pure Red Color, Pure Yellow Color, Pure Blue Color represented the logical end of painting.

rodchenko_red_yellow_blue_black_white.jpg
image of October reproduction of Rodchenko monochromes via e-flux

Which paintings now always remind me of a 2010 e-flux journal article about October magazine, which it turns out I'd misremembered a bit, but that's OK. Bernard Ortiz Campo wondered about art writing and why October only printed black & white images of artworks:

In the spring of 2000 in an article on Nikolai Tarabukin, the journal reproduced three monochrome paintings by Alexander Rodchenko: Pure Red Color, Pure Yellow Color, and Pure Blue Color. These three paintings, reproduced in black and white, resulted in three rectangles showing different shades of gray. As I looked at them, I found myself asking whether it made sense to reproduce them at all. I even entertained the possibility that the reproductions weren't images of the actual paintings, that perhaps they had been "rendered" by the journal's photomechanical process, and that the only thing that identified them as paintings by Rodchenko were the captions. I intuited that this extreme case could offer a reason for the black-and-white reproductions--hypothetical, of course, for being the fruit of my speculation, but a reason nonetheless.
I remembered this as imagining that the Rodchenko monochromes themselves didn't actually exist except as illustrations. And black & white ones at that.

yves_peintures_archive.jpg
Yves Peintures, 1954, image: yveskleinarchives.org

Which reminded me of one of my absolute favorite Yves Klein works, a book, or maybe it's a portfolio? More a catalogue. Yves Peintures bears the mind-bogglingly early date of 1954. The Klein Archives lists it as "his first public artistic action." It is a looseleaf booklet with ten color plates of monochrome paintings that don't exist.

yves_peintures_londres.png

They are commercial samples of colored paper, tipped in and given arbitrary dimensions and locales/titles: a Londres, 1950 (195 x 97); a Tokio, 1953 (100 x 65), &c. The accompanying text, credited to Pascal Claude, is entirely strikethroughs, assuming it was ever any less fictional than the paintings. [Speaking of writing, Philippe Vergne loves Yves Peintures even more than I do; he goes nuts for it in this 2010 essay about how Klein basically started and ended everything ever.]

yves_peinture_tokio.png

I've never been able to figure out quite how many copies of Yves Peintures exist, much less how I will get my hands on one. The Archives illustrates five examples, each different. The Archives has also authorized a facsimile of Yves Peintures, produced by Editions Delicta, in an edition of 400. I don't know how many variations are in that one, if any. I will guess none. The obvious solution is to make one myself, as the logical end of fictional monochrome artist book making.

Since 2001 here at greg.org, I've been blogging about the creative process—my own and those of people who interest me. That mostly involves filmmaking, art, writing, research, and the making thereof.

Many thanks to the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for supporting greg.org that time.

comments? questions? tips? pitches? email
greg [at] greg [dot ] org

find me on twitter: @gregorg

about this archive

Posts from November 2013, in reverse chronological order

Older: October 2013

Newer December 2013

recent projects, &c.


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Social Medium:
artists writing, 2000-2015
Paper Monument, Oct. 2016
ed. by Jennifer Liese
buy, $28

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Madoff Provenance Project in
'Tell Me What I Mean' at
To__Bridges__, The Bronx
11 Sept - Oct 23 2016
show | beginnings

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Chop Shop
at SPRING/BREAK Art Show
curated by Magda Sawon
1-7 March 2016

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eBay Test Listings
Armory – ABMB 2015
about | proposte monocrome, rose

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It Narratives, incl.
Shanzhai Gursky & Destroyed Richter
Franklin Street Works, Stamford
Sept 5 - Nov 9, 2014
about | link

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TheRealHennessy Tweets Paintings, 2014 -
about

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Standard Operating Procedure
about | buy now, 284pp, $15.99

CZRPYR2: The Illustrated Appendix
Canal Zone Richard Prince
YES RASTA 2:The Appeals Court
Decision, plus the Court's
Complete Illustrated Appendix (2013)
about | buy now, 142pp, $12.99

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"Exhibition Space" @ apexart, NYC
Mar 20 - May 8, 2013
about, brochure | installation shots


HELP/LESS Curated by Chris Habib
Printed Matter, NYC
Summer 2012
panel &c.


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Destroyed Richter Paintings, 2012-
background | making of
"Richteriana," Postmasters Gallery, NYC

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Canal Zone Richard
Prince YES RASTA:
Selected Court Documents
from Cariou v. Prince (2011)
about | buy now, 376pp, $17.99

archives