February 15, 2008

Q: Was The Pepsi Pavilion Art?

Of course, I'd only need to recreate The Pepsi Pavilion from Osaka 70 if it didn't exist anymore. Does it? No. As relations between Pepsi and Billy Kluver, the engineer founder of E.A.T., deteriorated over issues of budget and esoteric programming [Pepsi had originally envisioned their dome-shaped pavilion as a site of a string of rock concerts to entertain The Pepsi Generation coming to the Expo], Kluver argued that the entire Pavilion was a work of art and thus, a success, and thus, worthy of continued expenditure and preservation. Pepsi, literally, wasn't buying:

As an artistic experiment, though, it can be considered a success, and according to Klüver deserved to be treated as an art work.

In the case of the Pavilion, he therefore suggested to Pepsi-Cola to officially recognize the total work as an art work, in order to give it a legal structure. In a letter to Donald Kendall, President of Pepsi-Cola, Inc., he wrote "Our legal relationship to Pepsi Cola has developed so that the artists are put in the category of commercial artists designing a commercial product. One consequence of this is that we must obtain rights from all artists and engineers and others involved, particularly with regard to use of the Pavilion after Expo '70. Of course, there is no question of Pepsi's ownership and right to use and exhibit the Pavilion. Our dilemma is whether the artists have created a work of art or a work of commercial art to which there are rights which must be guaranteed... A decision to recognize the Pepsi Pavilion as a work of art and to treat it as such will set a much needed precedent in this area." Pepsi-Cola never took this step and eventually the Pavilion was left in a state of gradual desolation and decay. This was certainly due to the fact that the relationship between E.A.T. and Pepsi-Cola had considerably cooled down, to the point that the company, the sole sponsor of the project, withdrew its support when E.A.T. presented a maintenance contract for $405,000, instead of the proposed sum of $185,000.

Too bad the strategy didn't work; art seemed to be the only ticket to surviving the end of Expo 70. Today, almost all that's left of Expo '70 are Taro Okamoto's massive sculpture, Tower of The Sun, and Kiyoshi Kawasaki's International Art Pavilion, which until four years ago, housed the National Museum of Art, Osaka. Whoops, never mind: "The old museum was demolished and turned into a car park."

From Ch. 2, "The Nine Evenings," of M.J.M Bijvoets' Art As Inquiry [stichting-mai.de]
No museums, but m-louis's Expo70 photos do have sweet pavilions and the Tower of The Sun [flickr]

Since 2001 here at greg.org, I've been blogging about the creative process—my own and those of people who interest me. That mostly involves filmmaking, art, writing, research, and the making thereof.

Many thanks to the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for supporting greg.org that time.

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first published: February 15, 2008.

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