January 15, 2003

Maybe Take In A Show

The Architectural League, Cooper Union, and MoMA are sponsoring presentations and roundtable discussions by the WTC site architects and teams. Go ask the "Dream Team" what they're trying to cover up. [Sample question (from The Last Emperor), while hysterically, spitting mad: "Confess your crimes!!"]
Today (Wed.) at Cooper Union starts at 4PM and goes until 10:30 (it's sold out, but I bet it'll thin out around, say, 7.)
Tomorrow (Thurs.) at Town Hall is a more civilized two hour program, starting at 7PM. MoMA's Terence "I helped pick these teams" Riley is one of the moderators.
[thanks, Gawker!]

January 15, 2003

NYC vs. DC

Like Europe, it's the little differences. One that dawned on me at the gym: Underclothes

  • Manhattan locker room: shorts, some undershirts
  • DC locker room: undershirts tucked into shorts
  • Williamsburg locker room: I'm sure everyone'd be goin' commando. If there were a gym in Williamsburg, that is

    Sorry, no pictures. [And, thankfully, Frank Rich was not involved in this comparison in any way.]

  • This is what I sent to New Directors/New Films:
    Synopsis: A man carefully irons a shirt before spending the day at the rural Utah dry cleaners once owned by his grandfather.

    Utah Ark? It is shot in one day and is about the past, memory, and the links between history and present. It's not one take, ain't the Hermitage, though, and we didn't shoot the nearby Springville Art Museum...

    Dogme? Well, it's close. Perhaps fitting for a movie shot in small-town Utah, it adheres quite closely to the Vow of Chastity. But the Dogme filmmakers are fighting auteur-y demons I don't see, I have to confess, we didn't put a record player in the backseat of the driving shots, so our music is verboten. And they don't certify short films anyway Dog-me films, indeed.

    The Grandson: No violent deaths, no throbbing neck veins and stifled rage, but from the reviews for The Son and a familiarity with/admiration for the Dardenne brothers' previous work, I have to imagine some of their films' stylistic tendencies and refusal of melodrama have an (indirect) influence on my work. Cf. Souvenir's setting in a loud manual work-place, the handheld camerawork and (near) absence of music. I can only hope I attain some of their film's emotional impact. Read David Edelstein's Slate review .

    Gulfstream G500, image: gulfstream.comMy street may have more Gulfstreams than any other in the world; the peer pressure to get one is intense.
    Alec Wildenstein has one; he flew Nobu chefs around in it for his Russian girlfriend.
    Edgar Bronfman has a G-V, although it's not clear for how much longer.
    Donatella Versace refuses to fly anything else.
    Ivana Trump doesn't have one. And if Tony Mottola had one at Sony, he doesn't have it now.

    Lately, for reasons I will soon explain, Cessna, the makers of the popular Citation business jets, have been wooing me to purchase one of their planes. A stronger man might be able to do it, but I worry; if I bought a Citation, would I have to park it around the corner, so my G-Thang neighbors don't harsh on me? What's a simple filmmaker to do? I want to be independent, take a stand, but it seems like folly to go against the sentiment of "the Manhattan street."

    Clocking in at a not-dragging 11'16"; with balanced sound; a few sound effects, even (you'd never notice if I didn't mention it); a dramatically pared down soundtrack (just one song, with LP3 vinyl effects I wrote about Friday); some actually beautiful images; rhythm, edits and transitions I'm quite happy with; titles and credits made simple (through too much time and effort); and narrative and emotional elements I'm not sick of watching, Souvenir (January 2003) is DONE.

    Now it's off to the post, before the deadline leniency graciously extended by the Film Society of Lincoln Center runs out.

    Stay tuned for stills and a little more discussion when I get back.

    January 13, 2003

    S(J03) Stills

    Finally, some screen grabs from Souvenir (January 2003).

    Watching Joe spot a pair of pants, Souvenir (Jan. 03) dir. by Gregory Allen

    Want to see more? click here

    scintillement at the tour d'eiffel, image: abcparislive.com

    This morning on Kurt Andersen's Studio360, Paul Goldberger suggested "the Eiffel tower of 21st century, something that would use the technology of our time with the brilliance that Eiffel used the technology of the 19th century," be built at the WTC site. It's a powerful articulation (7 words, including an 'of' and two 'thes') of a compelling idea. [Listen here.]

    Interestingly, Goldberger discussed a similar idea on Studio360 less than a month after the Towers fell. [Listen here.] Keep your eyes peeled for a 3,500-word theoretical exegesis by Goldberger's successor at the Times. An unsung but influential force in the Ground Zero rebuilding debate, Goldberger early on uncovered the political playing field of the LMDC and Port Authority, and was the first to publish the early, architects' conception of the Towers of Light.

    Since I once visited Kings Island in Cincinnati as a child, I've never felt the urge to go up the Eiffel Tower. (The Ohio version is 1/3 the French one's height, I was about 1/3 my present height; I get the concept.)

    When the French wanted an Eiffel Tower for the 21st century (l'An 2000. Repetez: an deux mille), they got le scintillement: trillions of sparkly lights covering the Tower, which started scintillement-ing on the hour. It was a magical effect that'd stop conversations in Paris...like clockwork.

    Get smart: The Eiffel Tower at Wikipedia; Roland Barthes' The Eiffel Tower and Other Mythologies; fin de siecle idea for Eiffel Tower base jumping [via gmtPlus9].

    January 12, 2003

    Love Thy Neighbor

    Especially when you're in DC (i.e., away from DSL) and there's a new wireless connection pouring in through your window.

    The clock radio's out of the script, but music's still going in. In a piece about memory and attempting to connect with the past in a self-aware way, I want to use old-time music, my square-dancing-every-saturday, stack-of-78's-on-the-shelf, singin-cowboy, a-one-and-a-two kind of music (clearances pending, of course). And I want it to sound old.

    It seems I'm not alone. Randy Lewis just wrote for the LA Times about artists adding vinyl effects to create "a frame of reference that suddenly orients you toward another time." Hey, that's my idea: music that sounds like my grandparents' hi-fi or the AM country station in their old Buick.

    But a couple of the tracks I want aren't readily available on CD (some aren't readily available at all, especially in the Big City), and I don't have pro audio software, so for the moment (i.e., the submission deadline, remember?), I'm left with mp3. If logic, not Google prevailed, an LP-sounding mp3, then, should be an LP3: Here's how to make them, then get them ready to use in Final Cut:

  • Use Izotope's Vinyl Plugin for Winamp, which rocks. (You'll notice, if you switch, that winamp doesn't follow you.)
  • Output at CD-quality using Nullsoft Diskwriter, which generates a big WAV file, complete with vinyl effects.
  • Rip mp3's from the WAV's to ftp them to the Powerbook (I guess if I knew more about my wireless router, I could just network the two laptops and transfer them as WAV's... update: Yes, Australia, I could've used an iPod, but I don't have a Windows adapter for it.)
  • Use Quicktime Pro to convert the lp3.mp3's back into 44.1khz etc MOV files for use in Final Cut (this is needed to eliminate the popping and squelches mp3 introduces. I'm not evoking the Napster era here.)

    Friday night is now officially Audio Editing Dork Night. TGIAEDN!

  • January 10, 2003

    But Some Things Can't Wait

    Obviously, I can't do it now, but I have a list for a second edition of greg.org answers, wherein I provide the information you thought you'd find on this site, but didn't. [In the mean time, check out the first edition of greg.org answers and the in-progress Showgirls Special Edition.]

    Google search to launch a thousand anime episodes: "Tadao Undo, Architect"

    Since 2001 here at greg.org, I've been blogging about the creative process—my own and those of people who interest me. That mostly involves filmmaking, art, writing, research, and the making thereof.

    Many thanks to the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for supporting greg.org that time.

    comments? questions? tips? pitches? email
    greg [at] greg [dot ] org

    find me on twitter: @gregorg

    about this archive

    Category: art

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    Social Medium:
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    Paper Monument, Oct. 2016< br /> ed. by Jennifer Liese
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    TheRealHennessy Tweets Paintings, 2014 -

    Standard Operating Procedure
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    CZRPYR2: The Illustrated Appendix
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    "Exhibition Space"
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    HELP/LESS Curated by Chris Habib
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    Summer 2012
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    Destroyed Richter Paintings, 2012-
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    "Richteriana," Postmasters Gallery, NYC

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