Clocking in at a not-dragging 11'16"; with balanced sound; a few sound effects, even (you'd never notice if I didn't mention it); a dramatically pared down soundtrack (just one song, with LP3 vinyl effects I wrote about Friday); some actually beautiful images; rhythm, edits and transitions I'm quite happy with; titles and credits made simple (through too much time and effort); and narrative and emotional elements I'm not sick of watching, Souvenir (January 2003) is DONE.

Now it's off to the post, before the deadline leniency graciously extended by the Film Society of Lincoln Center runs out.

Stay tuned for stills and a little more discussion when I get back.

January 13, 2003

S(J03) Stills

Finally, some screen grabs from Souvenir (January 2003).

Watching Joe spot a pair of pants, Souvenir (Jan. 03) dir. by Gregory Allen

Want to see more? click here

scintillement at the tour d'eiffel, image: abcparislive.com

This morning on Kurt Andersen's Studio360, Paul Goldberger suggested "the Eiffel tower of 21st century, something that would use the technology of our time with the brilliance that Eiffel used the technology of the 19th century," be built at the WTC site. It's a powerful articulation (7 words, including an 'of' and two 'thes') of a compelling idea. [Listen here.]

Interestingly, Goldberger discussed a similar idea on Studio360 less than a month after the Towers fell. [Listen here.] Keep your eyes peeled for a 3,500-word theoretical exegesis by Goldberger's successor at the Times. An unsung but influential force in the Ground Zero rebuilding debate, Goldberger early on uncovered the political playing field of the LMDC and Port Authority, and was the first to publish the early, architects' conception of the Towers of Light.

Since I once visited Kings Island in Cincinnati as a child, I've never felt the urge to go up the Eiffel Tower. (The Ohio version is 1/3 the French one's height, I was about 1/3 my present height; I get the concept.)

When the French wanted an Eiffel Tower for the 21st century (l'An 2000. Repetez: an deux mille), they got le scintillement: trillions of sparkly lights covering the Tower, which started scintillement-ing on the hour. It was a magical effect that'd stop conversations in Paris...like clockwork.

Get smart: The Eiffel Tower at Wikipedia; Roland Barthes' The Eiffel Tower and Other Mythologies; fin de siecle idea for Eiffel Tower base jumping [via gmtPlus9].

January 12, 2003

Love Thy Neighbor


Especially when you're in DC (i.e., away from DSL) and there's a new wireless connection pouring in through your window.

The clock radio's out of the script, but music's still going in. In a piece about memory and attempting to connect with the past in a self-aware way, I want to use old-time music, my square-dancing-every-saturday, stack-of-78's-on-the-shelf, singin-cowboy, a-one-and-a-two kind of music (clearances pending, of course). And I want it to sound old.

It seems I'm not alone. Randy Lewis just wrote for the LA Times about artists adding vinyl effects to create "a frame of reference that suddenly orients you toward another time." Hey, that's my idea: music that sounds like my grandparents' hi-fi or the AM country station in their old Buick.

But a couple of the tracks I want aren't readily available on CD (some aren't readily available at all, especially in the Big City), and I don't have pro audio software, so for the moment (i.e., the submission deadline, remember?), I'm left with mp3. If logic, not Google prevailed, an LP-sounding mp3, then, should be an LP3: Here's how to make them, then get them ready to use in Final Cut:

  • Use Izotope's Vinyl Plugin for Winamp, which rocks. (You'll notice, if you switch, that winamp doesn't follow you.)
  • Output at CD-quality using Nullsoft Diskwriter, which generates a big WAV file, complete with vinyl effects.
  • Rip mp3's from the WAV's to ftp them to the Powerbook (I guess if I knew more about my wireless router, I could just network the two laptops and transfer them as WAV's... update: Yes, Australia, I could've used an iPod, but I don't have a Windows adapter for it.)
  • Use Quicktime Pro to convert the lp3.mp3's back into 44.1khz etc MOV files for use in Final Cut (this is needed to eliminate the popping and squelches mp3 introduces. I'm not evoking the Napster era here.)

    Friday night is now officially Audio Editing Dork Night. TGIAEDN!

  • January 10, 2003

    But Some Things Can't Wait

    Obviously, I can't do it now, but I have a list for a second edition of greg.org answers, wherein I provide the information you thought you'd find on this site, but didn't. [In the mean time, check out the first edition of greg.org answers and the in-progress Showgirls Special Edition.]

    Google search to launch a thousand anime episodes: "Tadao Undo, Architect"

    "I had a professor once who said that as Chekhov got older he lopped off the eventful beginnings and twist endings of his early works and that quivering middle was the mature short story." -David Edelstein, Slate
    Here's to you, David Edelstein. Geez, I love you more than you could know. This sentence (the phrase "quivering middle," actually), in a movie discussion I'd already posted about, convinced me to some changes in S(J03). Ch-ch-ch-changes? Well, I lopped off the ending, for starters. And there was that schmaltzy, obviously un-quivering scene with the clock radio. Gone. At first I was afraid, I was petrified. But when I heard Chekhov'd done it, well, ain't no stoppin' me now. [I have stopped the...cheap trick...of making insipid oldies music references, though. Boston, Chicago, you may proceed.]

    Chekov, image:nybooks.com
    So while I must confess to not having read much Chekhov, I have read several articles about Chekhov, and they have alternately inspired/influenced/condemned me. There's John Bayley's NY Review of Books. Review. And those previously untranslated short stories in Harper's, the ones where a friend I'd lost track of turned up in the translated byline. And a few more here and there. Cart, Horse. Horse, Cart, I know, but if I'm going to continue making naturalistic short films, I think I'd better study Chekhov a little more carefully. And I hear he wrote scripts, too. (image: nybooks.com)


    Sound editing tip: Keyframes are your best friend. Actually, The LA Final Cut Pro Users Group website is your best friend.

    Where'd you hear that? 2-pop discussion boards, you know you're my best friend.

    Of course, using keyframes to adjust your audio levels and effects doesn't make you a sound designer, any more than snapping pictures makes you a photographer.

    [Note to self: Last time you had to do this, you linked to freakin' Charlie's Angels. This time, put it on your own damn website so you don't have to ferret around for (seems like) hours trying to find the settings again.]
    FCP settings for a telephone effect filter
    There are two things that characterize a telephone sound: limited frequency range and harmonic distorion.

    For frequency, apply high pass filter (about 300 Hz cutoff, high Q), low pass filter (about 3000 Hz cutoff, high Q), and maybe a notch filter at about 1000 Hz. Play with the cutoff frequencies...

    I don't think FCP has any audio distortion filters. If you're not satisfied with frequency filters alone, apply distortion in a different audio program... Or play a clip and record it with a crappy microphone :-)

    JM (Thanks, JM!)

    Another note: I balanced half the audio levels last night (2AM), and finished this morning (11AM). As I listened to the whole piece through, the first half averaged about 3-4 dB lower than the second. The difference? No traffic or street noise last night. To a New Yorker, that's interesting. To anyone else, annoying. (Which thought did you have?)

    Charlie Rose Dream Team Pictures, image: charlierose.com That guy on the left isn't at all. He's Dan Bartlett, flak for the Architect of the Axis of Evil (and, alarmingly, the most straight-talking guy on the show) image: charlierose.com

    Just caught The WTC "Dream Team" (their quotes)--Charles Gwathmey, Peter Eisenman, Steven Holl, and Richard Meier --on Charlie Rose. [thanks for the headsup, archinect!] Preceded by an interview with White House Communications Director Dan Bartlett, Rose apparently chose obfuscation as tonight's theme.

    It was a lot of serious-minded awe eliciting empty comments about massive publicity ("How do you deal with being so great, old friend?"), one seemingly unintended admission, and an easy-to-miss editing mystery. (A coverup? If it were a coverup, I'm sure Charlie "60 Minutes2" Rose'd be on it, not in it...) What went basically unsaid (because unasked) was a discussion of the Dream Team's actual dream. (Check the Day After the unveiling, where the connection between their grid/tower concept and the wrecked shards of the original towers is made clear.)
    I am very unsettled by this team's refusal to discuss what seems to be the guiding principle of their design.

    Thumbnail image for dream_team_memorial_sq.jpg Gwathmey: "It's haunting...eerie" Meier: "ix-nay on the aunting-hay, uck-Chay" image: LMDC

    Still, Charles Gwathmey came really close when he talked about how their plan addresses New York at both levels, "the pedestrian plane" (! Plane?) and the "sky plane." (!! Two planes?) He said, "It's haunting. It's an eerie speculation about memory and presence. The image is incredibly powerful." Gwathmey's reference to the skyline rules out the possibility he was discussing the declared memorial aspect of their plan: street-level gardens in the shape of the Twin Towers' shadows, which extend across the World Financial Center and into the Hudson.

    There was no articulation of what this image is or why, no discussion of the form, no followup, no discussion about (this) memorial. Eisenman quoted Adolf Loos (again, also here, in relation to his Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), "The work of architecture is monuments and graves, and in other words, the work of memory." Even if I like their concept of a monumental shard taking over the downtown skyline (and I have to admit, it's quite powerful), their conscious avoidance of expressing or acknowledging their clear intent is arrogant, verging on deceitful.

    The surreal TV moment: a minute or so later, there's a jump cut; something was obviously excised from the conversation. While Eisenman is talking next to him, an anxious Meier is slowly trying to drop some folded papers from view, and all the while he's sending intense messages across the table with his eyes. To whom? According to that basic element of continuity editing, eyeline matching, it was Charles Gwathmey.

    Cinema Paradiso was better shorter, even if Giuseppe Tornatore sleeps better at night knowing his version was finally released last year. (I wrote about this when I saw the Director's Cut last May.)

    According to David Edelstein's closing post to the Slate Movie Club (Just as they get crankin' they end the series), Harvey Weinstein--the same evil producer whose 45-minute cuts made Paradiso-- wanted to hack 20 minutes off the end of In the Bedroom. "If he were to take an ax to (the Dardenne brothers') The Sonówhich is like the last act of In the Bedroom minus the conclusive violenceóit would be about five minutes long.

    After walking through the 13-minute cut of S(J03), my producer made the tough calls and gave me the spine I need to cut shots and scenes I love. For some tasty scenes, you'll just have to wait for the DVD.

    Since 2001 here at greg.org, I've been blogging about the creative process—my own and those of people who interest me. That mostly involves filmmaking, art, writing, research, and the making thereof.

    Many thanks to the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for supporting greg.org that time.

    comments? questions? tips? pitches? email
    greg [at] greg [dot ] org

    find me on twitter: @gregorg

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