May 1, 2002

that said, look up

that said, look up "albert maysles rides the bus" on google. Jussec, i gotta search this bus for filmic moments.

(in any case, riding the crosstown bus just got less boring. For me, anyway... )

May 1, 2002

so now i can post ...

so now i can post to my web log from my cell phone. Can i be worth reading in < 140 char.?

April 30, 2002

So I finally got at

So I finally got at least one production still off the Mac and onto the web. Here is the first of about 20 or so images from Souvenir November 2001, the one which accompanys all the press kits and festival applications (so far).

It's a scene of the New Yorker and the caretaker of Lochnagar Crater, a site that the film's protagonist stumbles across while searching for the Thiepval Memorial. (None of this makes the remotest sense to you? Welcome to my weblog. Check out the background links, script, and storyboard at the top of the lefthand column.) In this scene, the caretaker and his colleague explain the crater's origin and history. Read about the crater at the Friends of Lochnagar site. And read an account of the 1998 discovery of Private George Nugent's remains at the crater, an incident the caretaker discusses in the movie.

April 29, 2002

It was moving day, or

It was moving day, or moving around day, anyway. Traded weeks of keyboard-based work for overhauling the art in our little NYC house. Out with Roe Ethridge's landscapes (his great show just opened at Andrew Kreps Gallery, so we'll ALL be seeing more of his work for a while.), Anne Chu's watercolor landscapes, and Stephen Hendee's ink/gouache futuristic landscapes (see a theme here?) In with Vern Dawson and Olafur Eliasson (now that winter's over, it's safe to put up pictures of Iceland). And the kicker: a Wade Guyton sculpture that has a table-like object as its base. Looks so much like a table, I'm typing at it right now, in fact, until Wade comes to help set up the mirrored plexiglass column element that sits on top.


Since it's only table-LIKE, I stacked some books and magazines under the leg-LIKE elements to bring it to table height. Here's the list:

Godel, Escher, Bach; The Invisible Man; the last two issues of Vogue; Air Guitar by Dave Hickey; First They Killed My Father : A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers; Bret Easton Ellis' Glamorama; Sex and the City by Candace Bushnell (french version, which is hilarious, btw); Collected Fictions: Jorge Luis Borges; Projects for Prada Part 1 by Rem Koolhaas' publishing elves; an old Wallpaper*, a new Artforum, a Vanity Fair, Departures, an old art/text, and a beat-up New Yorker.


Then I looked at the finished piles, and I was reminded of the stylists at "shelter magazines" who artfully arrange erudite-seeming/trend-driven book spines for photoshoots (Remember that summer when everyone seemed to have Infinite Jest on his/her coffee table?). I couldn't find any articles about it, meaning 1) such magazine machinations may be an urban myth (unlikely), 2) I'm not hip to the right stylist-related search terms, or 3)people in the shelter magazine world don't use the internet for self-critique, just for hookin' up. I did find this excerpt from Marjorie Garber's Sex and Real Estate, which talks about the business of "propping" a for-sale house (using wood fires, apple pies, aromatherapy, flowers, etc.) to hit the prospective buyer's "romantic soft spot."


So what can we glean from our collection of titles? Is it the display window of my soul? I see two breakdowns:

  • Deliberately chosen books and "whatever's left within reach; can I put this table down now?"
  • Very thick books (4), and shims (the rest).

  • April 28, 2002

    Oh, before I forget: Send

    Oh, before I forget:


    Send an email if you're interested in coming to a private evening screening of Souvenir November 2001 in NYC, to be scheduled within the next couple of weeks. If demand warrants, we'll set one up in Washington, DC as well. I'm working on the date and location this week.

    Now that the movie's finally done, I have a little breathing room, so I went to one of the websites we shot really quickly for insert shots in the wife's Google search scene. Of the dozens of sites we shot, we included maybe 5, for a fraction of a second each (with more screen time for Google, because it's integral to the story). The page: "MIT Architecture: 9-11 and its Aftermath," with a lecture/article by Prof. HÈlËne Lipstadt titled "The Monument does not Remember."


    It was probably this combination of words that appealed to Jonah and caused him to include the shot of the page, but it seemed like a nice, oblique reference to the attacks and NYC's own questions about what comes after the World Trade Center, so we kept it in. The lecture's quite interesting, but even more interesting, is a memorial I'd never heard of, built within 72 hours (!) of the attacks at MIT. Called the Reflecting Wall, it was a full-scale model of a fragment of the WTC's distinctive column/window/column wall, executed in plywood. A remarkably moving and prescient gesture, it predated the emergence of images of the twisted, remaining fragment of the actual wall that became a familiar reference (and which doctrinaire voices rapidly included in any eventual memorial on the site).

    April 27, 2002

    As if nothing had ever

    As if nothing had ever gone wrong... This morning, I managed to get the completed, subtitled, sound-level-relatively-balanced version of Souvenir outputted onto a DV master AND several VHS tapes. What this means:

  • pain-free festival submissions
  • local screenings for family, friends, the crew and any potential partners, backers or distributors
  • I can sell the overpriced, underpowered Powerbook Titanium to which I can attribute some of the output problems.


    A hint to Final Cut Pro users with output problems: < geekspeak> After outputting the audio to a CD-file and the video (only!) to a Final Cut Movie file, I combined these two full-length (15 min) files into an entirely new project and sequence. It doesn't require any render files, etc, so it's entirely self contained in 3-4 files. Because these were sitting on a firewire external drive, they were inherently limited by the transfer speed of the firewire connection. I moved them off the ext. drive and placed the entire project on the laptop hard drive. Then I replayed the project via "Print to Video." It worked fine. Of course, because the G4 only has 10Gb, I had to delete piles of stuff first to make space. And if you have a larger project, you'll need a commensurately larger internal drive. < /geekspeak>

  • April 25, 2002

    First the good news: I

    First the good news: I got my keyboard replaced, and now I have my beloved Trackpoint back. Things are looking up.


    Bad news: Here is the list of picks for International Critics Week at Cannes. One short, The Day I Was Born, by Japanese director Manda Kunitoshi, features a "baby born on September 11 2001," so that may have filled the thematic slot I was targetting. There were no US shorts among the seven selected, though. In fact, there are no US films at all.


    Good news: I got the no-subtitles version dubbed and submitted to the Edinburgh Film Festival, which cut me a week's slack while I tried to get the subtitled version outputted.


    Bad news: I haven't gotten the subtitled version outputted yet. There are memory problems with Final Cut Pro, which doesn't seem to recognize the 30+ available gigabytes on my external drive. At this rate, though, I'll be able to sit next to everyone who watches it and translate the French parts for them.

    Sure enough. Here is the list of short films selected for Cannes. Two US films, including one by Bruce Terris, who was Pete Jones' 1st Assistant Director on Stolen Summer/Project Greenlight. Watching Terris' constant pushing/complaining about the importance of shot lists stuck in my head and proved to be very helpful advice for shooting Souvenir, btw.

    Since 2001 here at greg.org, I've been blogging about the creative process—my own and those of people who interest me. That mostly involves filmmaking, art, writing, research, and the making thereof.

    Many thanks to the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for supporting greg.org that time.

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