August 22, 2001

I've GOT to get this

I've GOT to get this film shoot log out of my head and onto the screen! It's been almost two weeks since we actually got back, but since things snowballed as soon as I got back to NYC, I left for vacation with Jean and have been even farther away from the net than before. Some vacation entries will follow, I'm sure, but I'll spare you most of the details.


On location, day 4 - Throughout the morning Jeff and I followed people around, fly-on-the-wall-style. We shot more farmers, some dry cleaning workers, and some older women doing housework and running errands.


The inspiration, I think, was Albert & David Maysles' Salesman, a film I first saw in business school, of all places, where it transfixed me with its simplicity, forthrightness, and insight. Now that the whole 15 minutes mentality has permeated (at least) US-driven society, the indifference to the camera that Maysles' subjects possess seems impossible to recapture and either eerie or nostalgic, depending on your POV. I can tell you that the presence of the camera and the notion that something is being said or done ON camera and could be repeated/disseminated are front and center in the minds of almost all our docu participants so far.
[if interested in Maysles, check out Maysles Films website or this interview with Al Maysles from The Onion's AV Club.]


After lunch, we were planning to do some driving shots: homes, fields, roads, field roads, irrigation ditches, highways, mountain canyons, etc. We got as far as the homes, fields and roads when the lens fell of the front of the camera and I drove over it. (I still have it and will post pics when I get back). Apparently, the threads had come loose during repeated rotations of the graduated density filter (which is half gray and half clear and is useful for shooting with outdoor light). Anyway, shooting wrapped up pretty quickly after that. We had to get the sound equipment back to my friend Dodge, so we just kept on driving. This unexpectedly abrupt end of shooting did NOT have anything to do with the fact that the crew had its first-and only-lunch with beer in UtahÖ


A final note from the crew regarding the location: Give up the search for good coffee early, at least in Utah County. Stick to 7-11 and avoid gas station/mini-marts, where 80-ounce refillable jugs of Diet Coke rule. In these locations, the coffee is generally the color of Coke (with melted ice), and apparently just as flavorful. One morning, I cracked, "I guess God doesn't want you to drink coffee," Jeff quickly (and accurately) replied, "Mormons don't want me to drink coffee."[note: I put the same link for both, since I'm a believer. ]

[Just ignore the dates. There's so much going on, I'm more than a little behind on the log.] On location, day 3 - We spent most of the day following around Chad, a 32-year old farmer in Mapleton. Along with his father, he works several hundred acres of land around town, including the fields he leases from my grandparents' farm. Here's what we spent the day shooting:

  • Changing the course of irrigation water: While the irrigation ditches we shot on Wednesday are concrete-lined with pop-out steel gates, the water Chad changed today was in a field with an unlined dirt ditch. He had hip waders as he took up and moved an 8' plastic tarp that served as a dam, and then he used a shovel to close the 6 or so openings in the side of the ditch that allowed water to flow into the field. It was freakin' (sic) hot (100+ degrees) with no shade. Jeff waded into the ditch to shoot, while I scampered along the bank, pushing through weeds with the boom mike (which is tethered to the camera), trying to keep up.
  • Feeding lambs in their pens: Completely deserving of their reputations as stupid animals (the theme of Babe notwithstanding), sheep are also extremely smelly. At least when they're in pens where straw and their own manure make up the groundcover. They basically stampeded around behind each other, kicking up dust. Oh, and they licked the hell out of the lens, necessitating several midshoot wipedowns.
  • Cutting grain: We followed and rode along as Chad and his 10-year old nephew cut a field of grain with a combine (Check out ebay to see what a combine looks like.), which kicked up mad amounts of dust and chaff. Their field is located right across from a small subdivision, which was built on top of an alfalfa field. All in all, it was a hot, dirty, tiring day, and I felt like a total city poseur by the time it was over.

    So after dinner, we went to Ream's, a grocery/western wear store, and bought big silver belt buckles with our initials on them. (Sure put a stop to that whole "poseur" thing, let me tell ya).

  • August 8, 2001

    On location, day 2 -

    On location, day 2 - Email still is spotty, dialup is only AOL. And it's hot as heck (as they say around here in rural Utah). Shooting's going well. We were up and out at 7 yesterday (Tues.) to pick up additional sound equipment (add a Sennheiser boom mike to the list of required gear.) and to find hay fields being cut, baled and loaded. (Note: It takes 3-4 days for cut hay to dry before it's baled; hauling is a couple of days later, so to get the entire process, we have to shoot several different fields.) About 80% of the fields in Mapleton were cut and baled a couple of weeks ago, so it took a little longer to find fields in process. Everyone we asked was very accommodating, letting us shoot with no reservation; the first field of guys (hauling) also pointed us in the direction of other fields being cut that day. Everyone knew my grandfather, so they were happy to help out. Jeff, my friend on camera, is pretty good at assimilating, while I basically looked like a tornado had picked me up off the street in NYC and dropped me in the field. (Note to self: leave sandals at home.)


    Today, (Wed.,) we've been shooting work on irrigation ditches, the network vital to farmers as they move water around the valley. There's a water co-op here, which schedules each farmer's allocation and timing. Sometimes, a farmer'll have to be out in the middle of the night to route water through a series of locks across the valley to his field at a specified time. Today, though, the farmers we were shooting were working in the 100+ degree afternoon. We didn't need our light kit, which is a plus... the camera's rubber eyepiece cap fell into the fast-moving current of the ditch and shot away. We got it on tape. "That run right in front of your uncle Juan's house [two miles away], so you could get it back," chuckled the 80-something farmer we were following.

    Tonight we're off to shoot the workers in my other grandfather's dry cleaning plant, then maybe going to the drive-in to see Planet of the Apes. IF we can log the tapes in time. Also, we've got to check the sound on one of our two mikes, so the levels sync up. Recording sound straight into the camera is easier and cheaper, but it gives you less flexibility when making changes later.

    We're here in Utah, shooting. Got in last night. Two points:

    1) Having been on DSL at home for so long, I didn't realize what a pain a dialup connection could be. Right now, I'm logged in through my grandmother's AOL account. This can't last.

    2) It's freakin' hot (you can't swear in Utah without turning major heads). Been running around picking up sound equipment, testing filters, fixing the eyepiece on the camera. If you don't have a full time equipment person, it's going to always take extra time fixing, adjusting, and finding missing pieces of stuff.

    August 5, 2001

    Since I made the decision

    Since I made the decision to actually go forward and shoot this film project (rather than just ruminate over it and periodically outline it), I've been watching films in slightly changed light. Now, I'm much more conscious of really parsing out:

    what a director's intentions were,

    when something was executed (i.e., writing, acting, directing, setting, editing, etc.)

    how he/she did it (i.e., technical processes, decisionmaking process).

    I basically have gotten into full "influence/tool/idea absorption mode. The result so far is a list of films I've seen or re-seen recently that have an impact on me and this project in some way (all links are to imdb and/or amazon):


  • Agnes Varda's The Gleaners - a simple, powerful movie--shot on DV--that basically pushed me over the edge to make this film.
  • Jacques Demy's The Umbrellas of Cherbourg - Bizarre if you get right down to it, but an essentially unique film that I've fixated on. I'm not making a bittersweet, technicolor french musical, though. [DVD]
  • Hirokazu Kore-eda's After Life - unassuming, thought-provoking, frankly touching, and carefully made (Kore-eda interviewed over 500 people for the film and included some of these non-actors in the production). [DVD]
  • Baz Luhrmann's Moulin Rouge - What is it about me and unconventional musicals? I was heartened that such a singular vision of a film could be realized, even if it's not completely successful. It blew me away in some ways, though. [soundtrack]
  • Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (Redux) - We saw it last night, first time on the big screen. Yow. Overwhelming. Whether it was just me, or the re-edit, or the big screen, it was definitely better than I remembered it. But basically, it's the diametric opposite of what I'm trying to do with this film. In so many ways. [DVD]
  • Terrence Malick's The Thin Red Line - I can't seem to stop watching this movie, whose release got so overshadowed by Saving Private Ryan (it seems silly to put them side by side for anything now...). It makes me want to shoot quavering fields of sun-dappled grass, though. [DVD]
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski's Decalogue - a 10-part made-for-Polish TV masterpiece of subtle, yet extremely deliberate storytelling based (somewhat thematically) on the Ten Commandments. Kieslowski's sense of narrative and of portraying the inter-related nature of individuals' lives and actions is an inspiration. [DVD]

  • It's two days before leaving for location shooting, and I've been wrapped up in myriad other responsibilities and projects that won't resolve. The takeaway: I've been ten minutes late all day, and it's made all the difference. (This phenomenon was portrayed in the Gwyneth Paltrow vehicle, Sliding Doors, which I didn't see.)

    Waiting in line for some free theater tickets from 6:10AM until 1:30, They handed out the last tickets 55 people in front of me, and the last cancellation vouchers 5 people in front. Basically, ten minutes late. Whatever, I had plenty of time to work through shot lists, which I can assemble into a full schedule for our 4.5-day shoot.

    From Central Park, it was off to B&H Video, an institution in the professional video/audio world. The store is run by a phalanx of orthodox Jews, so it's important to plan on NOT going there Saturday, when it's obviously closed. That they also close early on Friday (to be home well before the sundown start of the Sabbath) isn't news to customers, either. But who'd think they'd close at 2? Not me. I got there at 1:55, and five minutes into inputting my order of filters, polarizers, tapes, tape, and cables into the computer, the young guy helping me took off, leaving me hanging. So, back I go on Sunday...

    PS Thanks for the encouraging response to the "launch" of this log. I hope it'll be interesting for you. By far the most common question from readers is, "What's the film about?" I've pointedly not put too much description of the "plot," because right now there isn't one. The subject, themes and ideas of the film should become more apparent (to you and me) as things move forward, but for now I can say that I'm planning to tell the stories of my grandparents, who are from the neighboring towns mentioned in my last post. Stay tuned, I guess, to see how that might be at all interesting as a movie.

    August 1, 2001

    First week of shooting is

    First week of shooting is scheduled. We (the crew = Jeff and me, with another guy joining up on location) leave NYC for Salt Lake City next Monday and drive down to Mapleton. (The town has the rockin' URL, Mapleton.org. It's some Novell millionaires interspersed (or overlooking) the original farmers who built the town. Part of the Springville metropolitan area. Springville.org. These people were really on top of the domain registration thing...)


    We'll shoot through Sunday in and around Mapleton and Springville. There's an art museum in Springville, thus, the nickname, Art City. Number of business listings with "Art City" in Springville: 21. [source: Anywho.com]

    Adapted from Victor Khong's site, DV Cinematography

    A reasonable checklist of equipment and accessories for shooting using a Sony VX-1000. It makes fairly clear the difference between hiring a PM and a crew (the old/OPM* model) and prepping a shoot yourself, essentially from scratch (the new/MM** model)



    wide angle adaptor

    3 f-stop neutral density filter

    Ultra-violet (UV) filter

    Polarizer

    Diffusion filter - Cokin Warm Sun #694, Tiffen Pro Black Mist, Tiffen Pro White Mist, Tiffen Hollywood F/X filters

    Warming filters - 81a, 81b, 85

    Graduated grey filter

    Red filter

    XLR Adapter from Beachtek

    [2] Lav wireless mike kits and [1] pin mike

    Shotgun mic - Sennheiser MKE 300, 416, ME66 (not gonna do it)

    Boom pole, extendible painter's rod or aluminium shower curtain (same here)

    Manfrotto 055 tripod with the Manfrotto 136 fluid head (Victor's choice)

    Headphones with mini jack

    Softcase camera bag

    Reflectors - white/silver reflector, bounce card

    white balance card

    lens cleaner cloth (photoco)

    [4] camera batteries

    [2] AC Rapid battery chargers, [1] DC Rapid charger (Sony AC/DC-v700)

    1, 2, 3 closeup diopter filters for macro shots

    Gaffer's tape

    Vellum sheets

    light kit (detail pending)

    Indie Films Online has an interesting article and tips for lighting DV from Cinematography World



    * Other People's Money

    ** My Own Money

    July 30, 2001

    I killed most of the

    I killed most of the afternoon looking for our tickets to a sold-out concert tonight at Madison Square Garden, turning our apartment inside out (and feeling compelled to return it to more-organized-than-before condition) in the process. Why? because American Express doesn't provide purchase protection for tickets purchased on ebay [note: perishable link].

    The desire to post this otherwise evaporating anecdote doesn't bode well for my ability to keep this weblog on topic, though (see 28.07.2001 entry)...

    July 29, 2001

    Some links I've found as

    Some links I've found as I familiarize myself with to-date research and thought on how culture, worldview, personality, and behavior patterns develop or are transmitted:


    Faces of Culture [via PBS.org]

    this appears to be an introductory anthropology course comprising a series of films/tv shows. Interesting-sounding episodes include 204 Language and Communication, 205 Psychological Anthropology, and 206 Alejandro Mamani: A Case Study in Psychological Anthropology.


    Developmental Theories of Crime and Delinquency: Advances in Criminological Theory

    A dense but intruiging-looking essay on the theorized difference between people who demonstrate temporary/situational and repeated/persistent antisocial behavior. It showed up in a google search for cumulative continuity.


    Resource list of Margaret Mead's work [from the Institute for Intercultural Studies]

    Syllabus for Margaret Mead and Cultural Relativism [from Swarthmore.edu]

    The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead : A Historical Analysis of Her Samoan Research, by Derek Freeman, is a refutation of Mead's highly influential study of adolescence in Samoa, Coming of Age in Samoa. Both her theories and the controversy that emerged only after her death are interesting. (Of course, if these weren't interesting to me, I guess I wouldn't spent the time logging them.)

    Since 2001 here at greg.org, I've been blogging about the creative process—my own and those of people who interest me. That mostly involves filmmaking, art, writing, research, and the making thereof.

    Many thanks to the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for supporting greg.org that time.

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