April 25, 2004

British Government puts hand in shorts

In BFI's May 2004 Sight & Sound, James Bell looks at the world of British shorts. His findings: proper support is very important, but hard to come by; when you need it most, there can be no reaction at all; when they can't get someone else to do it with, people turn to handheld electronic devices to help them shoot, then they complain that it's "not like the real thing"; people are going online for some action; the word "gag" comes up a lot; it rarely lasts longer than five minutes.

If this sounds suspiciously like the situation in our American shorts, just remember: in the UK, the whole thing's funded by the government. [via GreenCine]

Since 2001 here at greg.org, I've been blogging about the creative process—my own and those of people who interest me. That mostly involves filmmaking, art, writing, research, and the making thereof.

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first published: April 25, 2004.

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NY, NY, A Minimal Town

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Kevin Spacey also getting into shorts

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